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Accountancy is looking different

ACCA technical director Sue Almond

By Sue Almond

I recently chaired a technical conference in Tirana in Albania. Other than the location, there's nothing particularly new about chairing a conference. That is until one of my fellow panellists commented on the composition of the audience.

I used my privileged position as chair to do a quick scan and headcount - a typical 80/20 gender split in a room of around 100 accountants.

But wait - the 80 looked like me! Well, not exactly, most were much younger. I couldn't resist pointing out to my (male) panellist that he might now appreciate how I have felt for most of my professional career. Accountancy is clearly an attractive career choice for young women in Albania.

I started to reflect on some of the other things I had noticed on this short visit and realised that this was a very different profession to what we typically see. Things are changing.

The previous day, I had been speaking at a conference organised by the Federation of Mediterranean Accountants. This had attracted an audience of over 220 - in a country with only 200 registered auditors. How often do we get this level of interest?

And the FCM conference attracted huge media interest, with Arnold Schilder of the International Auditing and Assurance Standards Board and Andre Kilesse of the Federation of European Accountants interviewed for primetime TV. It is highly unusual as an accountant to walk into a room with a whole bank of TV cameras, or to have the paparazzi buzzing around during a presentation on audit.

What probably made the greatest impression on me was the clear collaboration between the government and the accounting profession to build the economy for the benefit of all. Both the Albanian Minister of Finance and the Minister of the Economy addressed the conference. Their overriding message was that the accounting profession provides a bridge - that it can transform the past and make it into the future.

There was also a strong recognition at government level of the value that audit quality and oversight bring to the development of a strong and credible financial market. The emphasis is very much on reliable - trustworthy - financial statements, and the recognition that everyone has a part to play in generating confidence.

At home, back in the UK, I was listening to a news item on Radio 4 about the latest report from Cranfield School of Management, which reveals that women now make up 19 per cent of FTSE100 and 15 per cent of FTSE 250 board positions. The BBC reported that this is the highest participation rate since the university started keeping track in 1999.

This immediately reminded me of the conference in Albania, and that change for the accountancy profession is happening on a number of levels.

All this has made me realise that accountancy is looking different - a world where governments and the profession collaborate for the public good. Where accountancy is seen as critical to the future. Where accountancy is in the news for all the right reasons. Where women are the future of the profession. AND where the sun shines.

 

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